How to Make a No-Sew DIY Window Valance From Canvas Dropcloths

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How to Make a No-Sew DIY Window Valance From Canvas Dropcloths | 11 Magnolia Lane

Photo courtesy of Better Homes & Gardens Kitchen + Bath Makeovers

This is one of those tutorials that I almost didn’t think needed to be explained because it’s so easy (that’s a good thing, right?!), but I have gotten dozens and dozens of requests for it, so here goes!

When we redid our Nashville kitchen, I used canvas painters’ dropcloths to make the window treatments.  I made long curtain panels for either side of our sliding glass door, and a valance for above the sink.

How to Make a No-Sew DIY Window Valance From Canvas Dropcloths

Photo courtesy of Better Homes & Gardens Kitchen + Bath Makeovers

Dropcloths are a great source of inexpensive yardage.  They come in a variety of sizes and are a wonderful neutral shade.  Read more about the many uses for them in {this} post I wrote.

How to Make a No-Sew DIY Window Valance From Canvas Dropcloths | 11 Magnolia Lane

Photo courtesy of Better Homes & Gardens Kitchen + Bath Makeovers

This window valance is a great way to inexpensively dress a window, and best of all, it’s no-sew (my favorite)!

I buy most of my dropcloths at Home Depot; this is the one I bought for this window size:

Canvas painter's drop cloth
They’re also available {here} if you can’t find one locally.

Check to be sure that there are no center seams in your cloth before you buy it; usually there aren’t, but sometimes you’ll find one.  If you want to launder it ahead of time, or even bleach it so that it’s a bit lighter, now is the time.

For this window treatment, I used a dropcloth and jute twine, but for the “how to” photos, I used a curtain panel and some red ribbon so that the steps would be easy for you to see in the photos.  Of course, there’s no reason this technique wouldn’t work perfectly with the fabric of your choice and any string, twine, or ribbon.

Here’s how you make it:

Step 1:  Measure your window and adjust your curtain rod accordingly. 

Step 2:  Place your drop cloth good side down on a flat surface, and fold the finished edge in so it’s the correct width for the curtain rod:

How to Make a No-Sew DIY Window Valance From Canvas Dropcloths | 11 Magnolia Lane

Step 3:  Fold the bottom of the cloth up and over the top of the curtain rod (the longer you leave this section, the lower your valance will hang and the more “poofy” you can make it:

How to Make a No-Sew DIY Window Valance From Canvas Dropcloths | 11 Magnolia Lane

Step 4: Fold the top of the cloth over the curtain rod:

How to Make a No-Sew DIY Window Valance From Canvas Dropcloths | 11 Magnolia Lane

Step 5:  Now, hang your curtain rod up with the seam towards the window:

How to Make a No-Sew DIY Window Valance From Canvas Dropcloths | 11 Magnolia Lane

At this point, if you need to use a pin or two to secure your fabric “sandwich” in place, feel free.  I didn’t need to, but it probably depends on the weight of the fabric that you’re using.

Step 6: Using several lengths of twine or ribbon, create “poufs.” 

How to Make a No-Sew DIY Window Valance From Canvas Dropcloths | 11 Magnolia Lane

If you use two lengths of twine/ribbon, your valance will look something like this:

DIY-burlap-valances

FYI, that’s another no-sew valance project, with burlap, that you can read about {here}.

For my kitchen valance, I used three lengths of twine, and the finished product looked like this:

How to Make a No-Sew DIY Window Valance From Canvas Dropcloths | 11 Magnolia Lane

Photo Courtesy of BH&G Kitchen + Bath Makeovers

 

Step 7:  Fluff and rearrange until you’re satisfied!

Once you’ve figured out that you’ve got the right proportions with your fabric and the length of your twine, just fold, pleat, and fluff until you’re satisfied with how the valance looks.  This part can take some time, but you’ll get there!

You can read more about this kitchen redo {here} and {here}, about the painted tile backsplash {here}, and about the magazine feature {here} .

Let me know if you have any questions, and thanks for stopping by.

Final New Christy headshot 2015
 

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Comments

  1. I made these no sew valances years ago in a former home; however, your valances are much prettier!!!..Love them!

  2. Thanks for the tute! I am considering using drop cloths in my upcoming master makeover. These pics of your kitchen are PERFECTION!!! I have so much to learn about my camera and find that the kitchen is the hardest room to photograph. Love the styling too!

  3. Beautiful, can you tell me what the paint color is in the kitchen?

    Thanks,
    Tina

  4. LOVE! Pinning! Thanks for sharing your easy DIY!

  5. Okay I am the worst DIY’er, my brain can’t wrap around the simplest of projects. Happily I have other strong suits, but alas, this is not one.

    Is there not a step missing between 2 & 3? In 2, the top of the fabric is to the edge of the bed. In 3, it appears to be wrapped over somehow, but the step only addresses bringing up the bottom. I am a mess trying to figure out how to get this thing on the pole!

    (And you thought it was so simple no one would need instructions–I’m ashamed).

    • I’m sorry you’re having trouble. I looked back through the post and there aren’t any steps missing. The directions for each step are written out above the picture. Yes, in step 3 you bring up the bottom and fold it over the rod. In step 4 you fold the top over the rod. The reason you fold the bottom over first is so the edge is hidden.

      Maybe another set of eyes or hands can help? Sometimes it just takes another perspective. Good luck!

  6. You did an awesome job! This first caught my eye because it looks like they are gray tones in the pics….until you look at your recommended drop clothes….then it looks like browns….I’m confused….when your actually in your kitchen, do you see it?

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