A Tale of Two Toilets: 2000 Flushes to the Rescue

Our posts contain affiliate links.  If you make a purchase after clicking on these links, we will earn a small commission, which helps to keep our content free.  You don't pay a cent more than you would otherwise, since that would be tacky! Read our full privacy and disclosure policy here.

 

This post is sponsored by 2000 Flushes® Automatic Toilet Bowl Cleaner.  All opinions and dirty toilet bowls are my own.

So, as you all know, we’re in the middle of moving from our great big house to a tiny little house (if you’re not all caught up, read all the details here).  Because it’s a local move and we’re doing everything ourselves, it’s been a busy couple of weeks, but we’re almost finished.

As you can see in the above photo of what used to be my dining room and office, the house is pretty bare.  The piano is off to storage tomorrow and I’m finishing up the kitchen today, so it currently looks like a bomb hit it:

In the midst of all this moving chaos, it seemed like a good time to try a “2000 Flushes
Challenge,” or as I like to call it, “A Tale of Two Toilets.”  It’s basically a contest– one of our toilets got a nice 2000 Flushes Automatic Toilet Bowl Cleaner tablet dropped in the tank, and the other one (the control toilet, if you want to be all technical), got nothing.  And then, I didn’t do a thing to either toilet for three weeks, which is why the timing was perfect, because I wasn’t going to be scrubbing toilets during a move anyway!

2000 Flushes Automatic Toilet Bowl Cleaner has two different products: 2000 Flushes Bleach comes in a green box and 2000 Flushes Blue Plus Bleach comes in a blue one.  I decided to use the Blue Plus Bleach this time to add a pop of color to my powder room.

2000 Flushes
Whichever 2000 Flushes product you choose, it keeps toilet bowls free of 99.9% of bacteria with every flush, and delivers continuous cleaning action for up to four months.

2000 Flushes
What that means is that you can be a slacker even if you’re not moving and enjoy a sparkling clean toilet without scrubbing.  Bleach and blue detergents work together to keep your toilet stain-free and deodorized.

Because we’re friends, I’m about to show you something that not everyone gets to see (may not be suitable for younger viewers).  Here’s the control toilet, complete with a nice ring of pink yuck:

That’s what three weeks of no cleaning looks like in the control toilet, and here’s a close-up of the happy blue toilet on the same day:

As you can see, there’s no pink yuck.

You can bet that I’ll be dropping in a couple of 2000 Flushes tablets at the new house today!

To learn more about 2000 Flushes Automatic Toilet Bowl Cleaner and get lots of great cleaning tips, visit the Stain Fighting Community on Facebook.

Click HERE for information on where to buy 2000 Flushes and HERE to get $1 off your next purchase. Thanks for stopping by!

Final New Christy headshot 2015

 

icon-facebook-1icon-instagram-1icon-pinterest-1icon-twitter-1NEW Google+
 

Comments

  1. Christy, are these a new style of tablet which doesn’t destroy the flapper and toilet seal? Sorry for the all caps, can’t get iPad to get rid of them..

    • Hi, June–

      I checked with the folks at 2000 Flushes and here’s what they said:
      “Most destruction of toilet flapper or seal is caused by allowing chlorine to build up in the tank because the toilet is not flushed sufficiently. That is why we say on our chlorine tablet labels ‘Product should only be used in a toilet that is flushed at least once a week.'”

      It sounds like they’re just fine to use in a toilet that’s used regularly!
      Thanks,
      Christy

  2. Donna christensen says

    Christy,
    BEcause we go to Florida for 6 weeks I thought these would be the perfect solution for two idle toilets. Well, it was, kind of. We had a plumber come for a leak and he told me these where the worst things for the toilet as it eats away the porcelain. Food for thought. Btw I can’t get off caps either?

    • Hey, Donna–

      The all caps are part of the style of our blog, so it’s us, not you. 🙂

      I checked with the folks at 2000 Flushes and here’s what they had to say:
      “Most destruction of toilet flapper or seal is caused by allowing chlorine to build up in the tank because the toilet is not flushed sufficiently. That is why we say on our chlorine tablet labels ‘Product should only be used in a toilet that is flushed at least once a week.’ However, our products even in an idle toilet will not “eat away” at porcelain. What happens in an idle tank is the area the chlorine tablet is in contact with inside the bowl (an area not fired to smoothness like the outside of the fixture) can be stained. But the stain does not compromise the integrity of the porcelain.’

      I hope that answers your question–thanks for letting me know!
      Christy

  3. Same here—I just tried the blue bleach tablets and the plumber was here to tell me that it’s the cause of the slow leak in my tank! The bleach compromises the rubber flapper. I hate the pink ring, too, but swirling out 3 toilets 1x a week is better than expensive “repairs” that are easily avoided. Buzz kill!!

    • Hey, Dale–

      I wanted to follow up with 2000 Flushes on your comment and here’s what they had to say:
      “Most destruction of toilet flapper or seal is caused by allowing chlorine to build up in the tank because the toilet is not flushed sufficiently. That is why we say on our chlorine tablet labels ‘Product should only be used in a toilet that is flushed at least once a week.'” Ours gets flushed a lot more frequently than that, so I’ll keep you posted!

      Thanks for writing, and take care–
      Christy

Speak Your Mind

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

© 2017-2019 All Rights Reserved
shares