Spring Craft Idea–Retro Decoupaged Easter Eggs

Vintage decoupaged Easter eggs
I pulled out my Easter decorations the other day.  Yes, it’s still a month away, but my daughter wanted me to whip them out the same day I pulled down the Valentine’s Day decor, so she considers it quite late!  I don’t do a lot of decorating for the “minor” holidays (and sorry, all you Irish folk out there, but I don’t do a darned thing for St. Patrick’s Day besides drink a green beer), but I do have a few cherished Easter items that I love to put on display every year.

These decoupaged styrofoam Easter eggs that my mother made in the ’70s are still my absolute favorites.  One of them even has teeth marks in it from where I took an exploratory nibble back in the day–they really did look good enough to eat!

This is an incredibly easy project, even for those of you who are craft-challenged.  Begin with styrofoam Easter eggs, available at any craft store, in a variety of sizes.  You’ll also need a bottle of Mod Podge  (or other decoupage glue).  I usually use the matte finish.  If you’ve never decoupaged anything before, be warned that it can become addictive (check out this awesome blog for proof and some incredible tips and ideas!).

My mother used paper napkins for the project, and because they’re so lightweight, that’s probably the easiest thing to glue onto eggs without having a problem with wrinkles.  Obviously these are pretty awesome 1970s napkins, but we still have some great choices out there (Target and Hobby Lobby are probably my favorite napkin sources).  Scrapbook paper gives you an infinite variety of choices, too, but the thickness will make it a bit more challenging to work with.  If you’re not doing an all-over treatment, like polka dots or chevrons, then just trim out the pattern you want and glue it onto the egg using Mod Podge.  Finish with a dusting of clear glitter and you’re done (keep them away from kids like me who may try to eat them!).

I am also planning to use either old newspapers or book pages to decorate some eggs in the same way.  I might use the regular plastic Easter eggs instead of styrofoam and I’ll let you know if that works out as well.  Here’s a great picture that I pinned from Erin at LemonTreeCreations, and you can read her tutorial ~here~.

I’m going to give burlap a try, too, to add some interesting texture to my eggs, and what about wrapping a few in jute twine (like Sweet Bean Gardening did below)?  The possibilities are endless!

Twine Easter eggs from Sweet Bean Gardening

 

vintage decoupaged Easter eggs

What neat ideas do you have for your Easter decor this year?

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